Tuesday, June 10, 2014

"The kids are alright"—
Danah Boyd's It's Complicated: the social lives of networked teens

Danah Boyd is Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research, Research Assistant Professor at New York University, and Fellow at Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society.
It's Complicated: the social lives of networked teens (2014)I've just started reading Danah Boyd's brilliant new book, It's Complicated: the social lives of networked teens (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 2014).

From 2005 to 2012, Boyd toured the United States, "talking with and observing teens from eighteen states and a wide array of socioeconomic and ethnic communities," as well as conducting 166 formal, semi-structured interviews with teens.

She writes that this book is her
attempt to describe and explain the networked lives of teens to the people who worry about them—parents, teachers, policy makers, journalists, sometimes even other teens....
As I began to get a feel for the passions and frustrations of teens and to speak to broader audiences, I recognized that teen's voices rarely shaped the public discourse surrounding their networked lives. (x)
Coming of age

Boyd brings to the discussion a deep respect for teens, in the place of adult mistrust.  Her key insight is that
Most teens are not compelled by [social media] gadgetry as such—they are compelled by friendship. The gadgets are interesting to them primarily as a means to a social end....
Teens' preoccupation with their friends dovetails with their desire to enter the public spaces that are freely accessible to adults. The ability to access public spaces for sociable purposes is a critical component of the coming of age process.... (18)
Boyd reminds the reader that teens are challenged to envision themselves as young adults. Their efforts to set their own agendas and "to a be with friends on their own terms, without adult supervision, and in public," are part of coming of age.
Paradoxically, the networked publics they inhabit allow them a measure of privacy and autonomy that is not possible at home.... Recognizing this is important to understanding teens' relationship to social media.... [Their] engagement with public life through social media is not a rejection of privacy. Teens may wish to enjoy the  benefits of participating in public, but they also relish intimacy and the ability to have control over their social situation.... [Teens] go to great lengths to develop innovative strategies for managing privacy in networked publics....
Social media enables a type of youth-centric public space that is often otherwise inaccessible. But because that space is highly visible, it can often provoke concerns among adults who are watching teens as they try to find their way. (19)
The Significance of Networked Publics

To focus her work, Boyd broadens and sharpens the concept of "networked publics" first introduced by Mizuko Ito in the "Introduction" to Networked Publics (Cambridge, Mass.: The MIT Press, 2008, 1-14).
Networked publics are publics that are restructured by networked technologies. As such, they are simultaneously (1) the space constructed through networked technologies and (2) the imagined community that emerges as a result of the intersection of people, technology, and practice. (8)
Using this concept, Boyd normalizes teens' use of social media.
Teens engage with networked publics for the same reasons they have always relished publics; they want to be a part of the broader world by connecting with other people and having the freedom of mobility. Likewise, many adults fear networked technologies for the same reasons that adults have long been wary of teen socialization in parks, malls, and other sites where youth congregate. (10)
She then introduces Donald Norman's concept of "affordances" as a way of exploring the new social possibilities offered by technology. [See The Design of Everyday Things, (New York: Basic Books,1988).]
The particular properties or characteristics of an environment can be understood as affordances because they make possible—and, in some cases, are used to encourage—certrain types of practices, even if they do not determine what practices will unfold. (10)
 There are four affordances which Boyd argues make social media appealing to teens:
  •  persistence: the durability of online expression and content;
  • visibility: the potential audience who can bear witness;
  • spreadability: the ease with which content can be shared; and 
  • searchability: the ability to find content. (11)
 Boyd then addresses adult fears more directly, saying that the social lives of teens are far less different from those of their parents than many of us believe.
School looks remarkably familiar, and many of the same anxieties and hopes that shaped my experience are still recognizable today.... All too often, it is easier to focus on the technology than on the broader systemic issues that are at play because technical changes are easier to see.
Nostalgia gets in the way of understanding the relation between teens and technology. Adults may idealize their childhoods and forget the trials and tribulations they faced.... They associate the rise of digital technology with decline—social, intellectual, and moral. The research I present here suggests that the opposite is often true. (16)
Having seen this introduction to Boyd's study, I'm eager to learn from the teens she paid attention to how they understand their own use of social media...and how we adults might nurture rather than fear this aspect of their coming of age.

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Florida Legislature increases Library Cooperative & State Aid funds for FY2014-15


The Florida House and Senate have come to an agreement on the 2014 – 2015 state budget.  We have reason to celebrate!

All of you, Florida library advocates and all the members of the Florida LibraryAssociation are to be commended for your tireless efforts before and during the session. You collected data, crafted messages, and met with Senators and Representative in your districts and at the Florida Capitol on National Library Legislative Day, educating them on the important work that libraries do and the significant contribution all our libraries make to our communities – colleges, universities, schools, and towns and cities. Your hard work has paid off.

The General Appropriations Act, HB 5001 [Section 6, Program: Library and Information Services, p.389], includes an increase in funding for the Multitype Library Cooperatives (MLCs) of $500,000, for a total of $2,000,000, and an increase of $5.1 million in the State Aid line item for a total of $27,409,823.

There are also funds for a Largo Public Library bookmobile in the amount of $350,000 and Okaloosa County Public Library Cooperative funding is restored to its previous level of $85,000.

If you want more detail, go to the online PDF of the bill.  Either use find [binoculars icon] and search for “library” or go to page 389 for the details.


Many thanks to our lobbyist Chris Lyon for his hard work on our behalf, to our FLA Legislative Committee members especially Vice-Chair Charlie Parker and to both our Executive Directors during this past “year” Faye Roberts and Martina Brawer for doing great work on behalf of libraries in Florida.

Barbara Gubbin
FLA Legislative Committee Chair
Director, Jacksonville Public Library

Friday, April 18, 2014

"Kansas Teachers Lose Due Process in Firings"

March 10, 2014, vol.43, no.16, pp.4-5

The following is quoted in full from this week's Library Hotline:

Kansas Teachers Lose Due Process in Firings
On April 6, the Kansas State Legislature narrowly passed House Bill 2506, a school finance bill allowing teachers to be terminated without due process. The bill would make it easier to fire teachers and also relax licensing standards for schools hiring teachers in subjects like math and science. The passage of the bill follows the passage of an amendment on April 3 to cease state spending to implement Common Core standards adopted by the Kansas Board of Education in 2010.

Teachers and education activists protested over social media the passage of the bill, and the Moderate Party of Kansas has begun to circulate an online petition to restore due process for teachers.

The bill was in response to the Kansas Supreme Court’s ruling in March 2014 ordering the state to address the funding discrepancies between rich and poor schools by July 2014. The school finance reforms have been lobbied by far-right conservatives such as Americans for Prosperity and the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) and tied to a series of reforms aimed at closing the spending gap between economically diverse schools by allowing the privatization of public schools and their funding, among other changes.
Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback
The bill has been passed to Gov. Sam Brownback to sign, but he has yet to do so. The Republican governor seeks a second term, and while the Kansas State Legislature is in a firm Republican grip, the powerful Kansas National Education Association— Kansas’s largest teacher’s union—issued a strong message the day after the bill’s passage on April 7, as reported by the New York Times:

“We expect you, Governor Brownback, to VETO this bill as it diminishes teachers’ ability to advocate for their students without fear of retribution,” the group stated.

During the first weekend in April, hundreds of teachers in red T-shirts protested at the capital’s statehouse in Topeka. While Governor Brownback has yet to sign the bill, he issued a formal statement regarding the bill on the Kansas Office of the Governor website on April 6 indicating his support of the bill:

“House Bill 2506 increases funding to Kansas schools by $73 million and includes $78 million of property tax relief. The bill ensures that taxpayer dollars are spent efficiently, putting money in the classrooms to help teachers teach and students learn.”

Related articles:

Sunday, March 23, 2014

Jennifer Finney Boylan, "A Common Core for All of Us"

In the March 23rd New York Times is an excellent opinion piece by Jennifer Finney Boylan, a professor at Colby College and author of She's Not There: A Life in Two Genders.

I recommend reading the entire article, but here are some key excerpts:
Jennifer Finney BoylanWhat we’re arguing about is what we want from our children’s education, and what, in fact, “getting an education” actually means.
For some parents, the primary desire is for our sons and daughters to wind up, more or less, like ourselves. Education, in this model, means handing down shared values of the community to the next generation. Sometimes it can also mean shielding children from aspects of the culture we do not approve of, or fear.
For others, education means enlightening our children’s minds with the uncensored scientific and artistic truth of the world. If that means making our own sons and daughters strangers to us, then so be it.
My friend Richard Russo...noted that “it is the vain hope of middle-class parents that their children will go off to college and later be returned to them economically viable but otherwise unchanged.”
But, he said, sending “kids off to college is a lot like putting them in the witness protection program. If the person who comes out is easily recognizable as the same person who went in, something has gone terribly, dangerously wrong....”
It occurs to me that what enemies of a Common Core...have come to fear is really loneliness. It’s the sadness that comes when we realize that our children have thoughts that we did not give them; needs and desires we do not understand; wisdom and insight that might surpass our own
Maybe what we need is a common core for families, in which mothers and fathers, sons and daughters, all read the same book, and sit down at the table to talk about it. Having a language in common doesn’t mean we have to agree with one another. It simply means that we — as a family, a college or a country — can engage in a meaningful conversation about the life of the mind.
And so it is.

Blessèd Be,
Michael

Jennifer Finney Boylan became a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times in 2013, and has written for the Times opinion pages since 2007 about education, parenthood, gender and more.
She is the author of 13 books, including Stuck in the Middle With You: Parenthood in Three Genders. A professor of English at Colby College, she is the national co-chairwoman of Glaad and serves on the board of trustees of the Kinsey Institute for Research on Sex, Gender and Reproduction.

Saturday, March 22, 2014

Ring a bell?

In 2005, Alex Robinson published Box Office Poison, his Eisner Award-winning graphic novel about young writers and comic artists in New York City.

Protagonist Sherman Davies struggles to come up with anything publishable while working his frustrating day-job as a bookstore clerk...where the most frequently asked question is, "Do you work here?"

Yeah, so it's not a library, but you will probably recognize it....


The middle guy on the bottom  is Sherman's best friend Ed Valeasquez, teasing him.  The last guy is Robinson spoofing himself.


The last woman is Sherman's colleague Janice.

Can I go home now?

Friday, March 14, 2014

xkcd: Ancient Stars

Ancient Stars
 
xkcd.com, by Randall Munroe
Warning: this comic occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors).
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.

Friday, March 7, 2014

FCC Proposes New Set of Net Neutrality Rules

 
March 10, 2014, vol.43, no.10, pp.1-2

The following is excerpted from this week's Library Hotline:
 
FCC Proposes New Set of Net Neutrality Rules
In the wake of a January court ruling that struck down the Federal Communication Commission’s (FCC) standards for ensuring that Internet traffic is delivered without bias— a standard industry watchers refer to as “net neutrality”—the agency has issued a new proposal outlining a set of rules that would ensure Internet users have equal access to the full content of the Internet. Some experts, though, don’t think these new rules will be any more enforceable than the ones that were overturned earlier this year.

FCC Chair Tom Wheeler outlined his proposal in a statement on February 19 [see Fact Sheet]. While the newly minted FCC proposition makes some technical changes to the law, the heart of the agency’s definition of an Open Internet remains largely the same, working to ensure that no providers are blocked or discriminated against, and that Internet Service Providers (ISPs) are transparent in telling consumers how they allocate bandwidth on their networks.

Wheeler also noted that the FCC would not challenge the ruling handed down last month from the DC Circuit Court of Appeals. That ruling allowed the FCC to continue enforcing transparency in ISP practices and working to ensure broadband access under Section 706 of the Telecommunication Act of1996. The FCC’s new plan is to make rules similar to those that were recently struck down but this time under the authority of Section 706.
“In light of the Court’s finding that the Commission has authority to issue new rules under Section 706 and the ongoing availability of Title II, the Commission will not initiate any further judicial action in connection with the Verizon decision,” Wheeler’s statement read. The current statement is merely a suggestion, with a more formal set of rules expected sometime in late spring.

Just how much success the FCC will have enforcing these new rules under Section 706, though, remains to be seen. According to the American Library Association (ALA), there’s a lot riding on Wheeler and his commissioners ensuring that ISPs can’t discriminate among kinds of traffic.
“We’re really pleased to see that Chairman Wheeler and the FCC are moving forward and revisiting these rules, and we certainly hope they’re successful this time,” said Lynne Bradley, director of ALA’s Office of Government Relations. “This is a go-to- the-mat issue. The American public can’t afford for them not to get this right.